Can You TIG Weld Over a MIG Wield?

Share

Can You TIG Weld Over a MIG Wield

In this article, we will explore the question of whether you can tig weld over a MIG weld. If you are wondering what that means, it is when someone tries to fill in a spot where they have previously welded something with a new piece of metal.

This is typically done by using one type of welding process and then going back with another to cover up the flaws from the first.

Can You TIG Weld Over a MIG Wield?

Yes, you can tig weld over a MIG weld. If the MIG welder has left some spatter on top of your tig welding work it is ok to go ahead and continue working over this surface with more arc strikes.

There should be no problems with contamination between these two processes during layering operations (when building up thickness) with proper technique. Here are the techniques we recommend:

Technique #1

If you are welding with the tungsten electrode pointing up (the standard technique), it is okay to continue after a MIG welder has finished.

Technique #2

If your tig torch and workpiece are configured so that the tungsten is pointed down, all you need to do when the MIG welder finishes their weld pass or bead line is wait for them to break contact with the surface of your material before continuing.

Just as if they were another member of your crew waiting patiently in line! This will ensure no contamination between these two processes during layering operations (when building up thickness). Be mindful not to be too aggressive striking an arc while they are still connected, as spatter may be kicked onto their work.

Technique #3

If you are doing a root pass (i.e., welding on the underside of your material) and you have just completed this weld, then it is ok to continue working as long as they wait for you to break contact with the surface before continuing.

If there was any spatter deposited from their MIG welder during that weld pass/bead line, these should be inspected very carefully since they will serve as an ignition source inside your tig torch if struck by your tungsten electrode.

Technique #4

Another technique is to wait for them to break contact with the surface of your material before continuing.

If there was any spatter deposited from their MIG welder during that weld pass/bead line, these should be inspected very carefully since they will serve as an ignition source inside your tig torch if struck by your tungsten electrode.

Technique #5

If you’re in a hurry and don’t want to wait for the other worker, just start striking arcs after breaking contact with the top surface (as described above).

You may get some spatter on top of your TIG welding work but this is not necessarily bad, and all you need to do is inspect it carefully and clean off any contamination.

Technique #6

If the MIG welder has left some spatter on top of your tig welding work, can simply wipe this away with a damp cloth or sponge before continuing. Since Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welds are normally done at lower amperage than MIG welds, this should not cause problems during layering operations (when building up thickness).

However, if there was too much contamination from their process onto yours, then you may want to consider cleaning the material first before moving forward. The heat created by striking an arc will help burn/melt away most residue that could obstruct your view and any impurities.

With these simple techniques, you can rest assured that your work will be free of contamination when completed. You can also check our post welding ar500 steel and removing welding spots from glass.

Share

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.