How to Cut Pressure Treated Wood with a Miter Saw: 5 Quick Steps

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How to Cut Pressure Treated Wood with a Miter Saw

Cutting pressure treated wood with a miter saw can be tricky, but not if you know the rules. This article will teach you how to cut pressure treated wood using a miter saw and help you avoid some of the mistakes that many people make when cutting this type of material.

How to Cut Pressure Treated Wood with a Miter Saw

Here are the 5 quick steps for how to cut pressure treated wood with a miter saw.

Step 1: Set your Miter Saw for the Right Angle

The first step is to set the miter saw’s blade at a 90-degree angle. You need to do this to ensure that you can cut right through the pressure treated wood.

Step 2: Line up Your Blade to Cut Pressure Treated Wood at Full Depth

The second step is to line up your blade so it will cut all the way through the PT lumber. This means lining up both sides of your blade with each other and making sure they are parallel. You may need to use a tape measure for this part if you don’t feel confident in eyeballing it.

 Step 3: Set Saw at Appropriate Cutting Depth  for Pressure Treated Lumber   

The third step is cutting depth, which varies depending on what kind of miter saw you have (a standard miter saw or compound miter saw). It’s important not to cut too deep for pressure treated lumber, or you risk damaging your blade.

Step 4: Use a Push Stick  for Pressure Treated Wood       

The fourth step is to use a push stick when cutting through the wood in order to keep it sturdy and level with the saw blade at all times. This will reduce vibration while also protecting fingers from injury. A standard miter saw has an adjustable clamp that is helpful here; otherwise, simply cut on top of whatever material you are using as your guide (e.g., scrap plywood).

Step 5: Flush Cut  Pressure Treated Lumber with Miter Saw    

The fifth and final step is flush cutting – this means getting rid of any uneven angles by cutting the PT lumber to a smooth, flat surface. You can do this with your miter saw or simply use a hand saw for speed and accuracy.

The 6 Rules You Need To Follow When Cutting Pressure Treated Wood With a Miter Saw

Wear Protective Clothing

Make sure you wear the proper clothing when working with pressure treated wood. This includes safety glasses, gloves and a respirator if you are cutting indoors (or in an enclosed area).

Make Sure You Have Plenty of Light

Be sure that your work area is well lit. When using power tools like miter saws, it’s always best to go for good lighting rather than relying on light from windows or lamps. These can cast shadows, leading to accidents!

Get The Right Saw Blades Ready

You will need special blades designed specifically for cutting pressure-treated lumber so be sure they are available before you get started. If not, hold off until you have them at hand because there is no sense in starting the job only to realize halfway through that you are missing a crucial piece.

Follow the Grain

Always follow the grain of the wood when cutting pressure-treated lumber – this means making sure you cut in line with any grooves or lines that could be present on your board. This is because these often indicate where each board’s best, strongest part can be found, so it’s important to take extra care not to damage them while using power tools like miter saws!

Only Cut One Board at Once

When possible, only ever cut one single board/piece of pressure treated lumber at once instead of multiple pieces, which will put unnecessary strain on your equipment and increase the potential for injury (if something goes wrong). However, if you need more than one piece, make sure they don’t add up to more than you can handle.

Use Wood for Extra Support

When cutting pressure-treated wood, use a scrap piece of the same material as support when placing your power tool on top – this will help prevent slips and accidents from occurring while increasing stability!

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